I recently started playing Pokémon again - “Pokémon Let’s Go Eevee” on the Nintendo Switch to be specific. In the classic Pokémon games, you have a team of 6 Pokémon that you use to battle against other trainers. In battles, type match-ups are very important, as some types of moves are “super effective” against other types. For example, fire moves are super effective against grass Pokémon, which means they do double the damage they normally would.

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In this post, I try something new and share an analysis I did without stopping to explain the code along the way (with a few exceptions). I analyze a dataset on Bob Ross paintings from last week’s Tidytuesday, an initiative by the R for Data Science online learning community. Each Monday, a new dataset is posted on GitHub with a short description. You can see some analyses and visualizations people have done by searching for the #tidytuesday hashtag on Twitter.

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Have you ever had a “first this then that” question? For example, maybe you’re an e-commerce business and you want all the times people clicked on an item and then added it to their cart within 2 days, or the last page they visited before registering. Or you work with pharmaceutical data and need to know what drugs people took before drug x and which drugs they took afterward and when.

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I recently completed Colin Fay’s excellent DataCamp course, Intermediate Functional Programming with purrr (full disclosure: I work at DataCamp, but part of why I joined was that I was a big fan of the short, interactive course format). Although I’ve used the purrr package before, there were a lot of functions in this course that were new to me. I wrote this post to hopefully demystify purrr a bit for those who find it overwhelming and illustrate some of its lesser known functions.

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In early 2018, I gave a few conference talks on “The Lesser Known Stars of the Tidyverse.” I focused on some packages and functions that aren’t as well known as the core parts of ggplot2 and dplyr but are very helpful in exploratory analysis. I walked through an example analysis of Kaggle’s 2017 State of Data Science and Machine Learning Survey to show how I would use these functions in an exploratory analysis.

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Author's picture

Emily Robinson

Date Scientist at DataCamp

Data Scientist

New York